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and that cities are key to the economy. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, we've had high-profile examples of public-private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. one reason we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money, but to provide oversight, you have somebody to go to when you have a project, a regulator. an interlocutor. we should alloy private money. there's an additional problem. about so-called eminent domain. you can't just clear things out in china they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving. we're building a road here. you got to move out of your apartment tomorrow. we can't do that. it makes it trickier in our older cities to rebuild in the way they did in china. >> it's an interesting analo
you some of the figures. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. now, we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, but we've had some high-profile examples of public/private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. and by the way, one reason when he we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money but just to provide oversight and ombudsman so that you have somebody to go to when off project or regulator, an interlocutor perhaps. we should definitely allow private money. there is an additional problem, and richard probably knows more about this, about so-called eminent domain, where you can't just clear things out. in china, they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving, we're building here a road here. you have to move out of your parm tomorrow.
proxies for medallions. they are required to operate cabs in many large cities including new york. the meters run higher than most other asset classes for decades. >> i don't think we ever thought it would hit a million dollar price. they have gone up 15% per year for 70 years. outperforming the dow, gold, nasdaq and real estate. >> his grandfather bought one of the badges for 10 bucks. 10,000% return since 1937. look at stock when you reinvest dividends, leaving s&p 500 behind in its rear view mirror. david: what do one cost? >> million bucks for the corporate guys. one million bucks or 700,000 for an individual. david: thanks, robert [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind aumatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi
medallions are required to operate cabs in many large cities including new york. they were first issued in the big apple during the great depression. >> back in 1937, this little piece of tin sold for $10 each. >> his grandfather bought one of the first badges and medallion financial was born. the company has seen quite a return on that first investment and on hundreds more medallions it bought since then. back in the late '70s when the checker cabs were cruising the streets of new york city, a taxi medallion would set you back less than $100,000. now this piece of metal on the front of your cab will set you back more than a million bugs. >> i don't think we ever thought it would hit a million dollar price. they have gone up 15% per year, 70 years. outperforming dow, gold, nasdaq, real estate. you name it. >> analysts marvel at the company's track record. unlike most banks, medal i don't know never had default on taxi loan. >> real estate lending someone defaults it is years before banks get money back. it is terrific collateral. the medallion is the little tin. if somebody doesn't pay
highest violent crime rate of any middle to large-sized city in the country. so you've got a couple things here. you have chosen a path. you said you know what? we like the idea that the democrats are giving to us and you have gone down this path for 50 years and you have nothing to show for it but despair. a bailout is not going to solve your problem. think about what you are doing when you go to vote. would a bailout be a gift, with someone saying straighten your life out now. stuart: i agree with you. this is surely a larger picture here. if detroit wants it and appeals to the president to get some money because they voted for the president, what about california? what about illinois? what about any other of the states which voted overwhelmingly for president obama and are in dire financial shape? it could open the door. quick comment? sandra: absolutely. i think this could be the big change over the next four years, if you hear more cries for help, and they don't get it, maybe that's when the republican party starts to look pretty good. stuart: that will be interesting. next we will sh
, new government warnings, how governments may be collecting large amounts of data on your kids. you're watching "first look" on m s msnbc. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. >>> some stories making news this morning. "the new york times" reports that
, large sections of kansas city on both the kansas and missouri sides will be wired. >> this is salt lake what you wanted. >> exactly -- this is exactly what you guys wanted. >> exactly. we want to take advantage of the faster speeds that google fire will bring and develop. the sky's the limit. >> reporter: how high is that? even the tech wizards aren't sure. >> you know, we've been asked that question a few times. the truthful answer is we don't know yet. we have a new technology that no one else has in the nation, and it can take our business to a new height that we didn't even dream of. >> reporter: the practical effects are easier to predict. better property values, more reasons for investment for top talent to come and stay. how much impact can all of this have on your city? >> i think at the end of the day if you ask any mayor growing that small business, finding that entrepreneur, willing to take a risk in your community is going to grow jobs and ultimately the economy. >> reporter: for now, dreams are growing wild out on the silicon prairie. tom foreman, cnn, kansas city, kansas.
in an effort to restore balance. we are expecting large protests here today outside the palace here in cairo. in the city of alexandria, there have been more violent clashes between president morsei's opponents and his supporters. the president's opponents are demanding that he immediately gives up all of the sweeping new powers that he gave himself two weeks ago. they also want him to postpone a referendum on egypt's new constitution, due to take place in just over a week. critics say that constitution doesn't protect the rights of all egyptians. but president morsi didn't do either of those things last night. instead he offered to give up just one of his new powers, vaguely worded right to take all necessary measures to affect the country. he said he would give up the other powers once the referendum had taken place. also yesterday, president obama telephoned president morsi to express his deep concern over the violence and deaths that have occurred. he also urged president morsi to have a dialogue with the opposition without any preconditions. for "cbs this morning," holly williams, cairo
. >> it is a very large storm and there's a couple of components to this from kansas city and through des moines then bending back toward milwaukee, that's where the heaviest snow is right now. >> some of those first responders trained for a mass casualty event but certainly never expected to see one. >> you're numb. there is no emotion at that point. you don't fall apart until way later. >> did you fall apart? >> not yet. >> two chicago prisoners are still at large this morning after a daring escape. >> one of their relatives said they could be in paris by now. >> they're cunning, they're daring, and they pulled off something that nobody has pulled off in that jail for 30 years. >> >> i have a problem. >> like a rock? >> the speaker of the house is pushing for a vote on his own plan "b" today. >> if plan "b" doesn't work, they have to go to plan "c," and plan "c," as you know is just pray to end that thegod that the world does end friday. that's plan "c." that's why we're here. >> i'm charlie rose with gayle king and norah o'donnell. the house is set to vote today on spea
economy is putting more large trucks on the road or maybe because of all the bike lanes in new york city and people are angry and trying to hit them. can't confirm that. >>> triple a reports the average annual price of gas this year will almost certainly top last year's record. well, despite that, prices are falling now and in a big way. the lund berg survey shows the average cost of a gallon of regular unleaded is down 10 cents over the past three weeks and i continuing down. what's causing this, rich? >> reporter: americans are driving less. that and slowing economic growth mean the world is using less oil. after problems earlier this year, refineries are pumping out more gas. also, warmer than average temperatures meaning americans are using less oil to heat their homes. all that pushes prices down further. prices also spiked after hurricane sandy and have fallen since, shepard. >> shepard: so right now they're headed down more, right? > >> reporter: that's right. there's a difference between lowest and highest of 80 cents a gallon. 3.85 in long island, in mems me, tennessee, it's les
it way to them, it will make it to large agents and barr creas bureaucrar filter down. >> we have a potpourri of task forces and agents out there assessing the damage, and trying to tell the state and city. neil: what do they do run around with clip boards? >> they do, they have clip boards, and they bac back flappg with politicians,. neil: what do you do with the femafficials? >> we don't see the officials, we see the rep they are holed up in a trailer making decisions on what next person they will appoint to what next task force. but people are not getting any help. and what i can tell you, that there one guy who i think has a good solution, new york state senator, andrew lande, he reached out the me today, said, john, i need you and i need you to find me guys like you on the ground i can bring civilians into this task force, give us ideas where we need help, and what we can do with this money when he get it. how -- >> we're channeling it through washington, and the agents and regional heads then to staten island, then jersey shore pennies on the dollar by that point. >> the smi
% so this president's willing to get corporate tax deductions to the large corporations, and not willing to help those who are small. neil: senator, i may be over analyzing this stuff. i was in your fine city yesterday, and everyone sort of read things differently, but when i heard the administration float a trial balloon of we'll look at lowering corporate tax rates or corporate tax reform, was that their way of trying to entice the hatches and others of your still skeptical minds to come support an agreement that would include all of the above in >> i don't think so. you know, i care less what the wealthy have, but there's a human number of small businesses hit by this. their marginal tax rate up 24%. 53% of the businesses will be hit very, very hard. most of them put moneys back into the business so they can hire people. they don't particularly take their moneys out, but, you know, if they are going to have to pay marginal tax rates 24% higher, they will not hire people. that's the problem. 70% of all jobs come through the small business sector, and i's as though the
to testify next thursday, that is likely to conclude that the state department was largely at fault for failures, security failures prior to benghazi. so to blame susan rice who's over at the u.n. mostly in new york city for benghazi is really a stretch. she was the person who went out on sunday television. and she said today to brian williams that she is not blameless. i think there was a lack of care with the talking points and the republicans seized on it and claims she was being political and trying to be political at a key point in the presidential election campaign, which she strongly denies. >> but you're saying that the president's statements to that effect were not enough because they were not backed up with essentially procedural support for her to be fighting these attacks that could have happened had he nominated her. >> once she's nominated she is armed with the white house counsel's office-w every wise person, man or woman in washington who would be assigned to her to get her through the nomination process. but she was left -- she said she didn't feel that she's a vict
-presidential protesters in tahrir square. in other parts of the city, about two miles from here, as many as 200,000 protesters turned out. these are people who support president morsi. many of them from the muslim brotherhood. a large number were bussed in from rural areas in egypt. many carrying the koran and shouting, god is the law. it was a real show of force and show of public support by those who support egypt's new president. he also announced there will be a constitutional referendum on december 15. it came really after a vote on friday pushing through that constitution in one day. now the nation will have the chance to vote up or down on that constitution. president morsi said the extreme powers he declared for himself last week would end when that constitution is ratified. perhaps in just two weeks' time. it's not clear that's going to be enough for the protesters behind me, some of whom intend to sleep on the square until they drive president morsi from power. rick, back to you. >> rick: steve streaming live from cairo. thanks. >> arthel: closer to home, our neighbor to the south swe
areas, that he's surrounded by a large contingent of loyal fighters. but that narrative is pre- 9/11 understanding of ubl. the second narrative, he's living in the city, living in a city with multiple points of egress and entry, access to communications, so that he can keep in touch with the organization. you can't run a global network of interconnected cells from a cave. >> that was a clip of the new movie called "zero dark thirty," chronicles this mission highlighting many of the people in the takedown including this young woman in seeking, finding, killing osama bin laden. in this new report from "the washington post," this mystery cia operative has a very complicated life, even more so after the bin laden raid. joining me from washington is greg miller, the intelligence reporter with the post, with "the washington post." welcome. >> thanks. >> what an article. i read it and from what i can tell, and also listen to an interview with catherine bigelow. this cia operative found the link to the courier to drive this forward to find osama bin laden. who is she? what do you know? >>
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15